Welcome to Lucy Writers, an online platform devoted to showcasing the writing of women and non-binary creatives.

Lucy Writers is an online platform showcasing the very best writing and art work from women and non-binary creatives all over the world. In collaboration with Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, the platform brings together Lucy students, alumnae and fellows, as well as creatives from outside the college community. Lucy Writers welcomes submissions from women and non-binary writers irrespective of whether they’re an established or new-to-the-writing-desk writer. We want to hear from you; let Lucy Writers be the space, room and home for your words.


‘Voice’ by So Mayer

After seeing artist Charlotte Salomon’s work in an exhibition before the first lockdown, So Mayer started to reflect on the evolution of Salomon’s innovative, word-strewn paintings. Here, they consider how Salomon’s work conjures and embodies a unique voice, a bold assertion of self that defies curatorial and art historical prejudices.

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Gargoyles by Harriet Mercer: a lyrical exploration of the space between life and death

In the aftermath of serious illness, Harriet Mercer explores painful and often traumatic experiences in a narrative that beautifully renders what is still, too often, “unthinkable / unthought”.

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Modal Painting at Maximillian William, London

Oscar Wollheim curates a sumptuous suite of five great abstract masters – Bowling, Gilliam, Golding, Hoyland and Sylvester II – in his imaginative and vibrant exhibition, Modal Painting, at Maximillian William.

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‘On Toast Crumbs’ by Rachel Sills

A new mother feels her world contract down to the daily domestic rituals of cooking, cleaning and care-giving in Rachel Sills’ haunting flash fiction, ‘On Toast Crumbs’.

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Wish We Knew What to Say: Talking with Children About Race by Pragya Agarwal

Packed with fascinating stories, thorough research and helpful definitions, Dr Pragya Agarwal’s book, Wish We Knew What to Say, is essential reading for all educators, parents and care-givers when it comes to talking with children about race.

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‘Anchor Ourselves’ by Anna McKelvie

In her poem, actor and poet Anna McKelvie cleverly employs the metaphor of a boat at sea to express the difficulties, uncertainty and camaraderie experienced during the pandemic. Here, friendship triumphs over troubled waters.

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The Politics of Couscous

Couscous traditions have been passed down through women since 200 BCE in North West Africa. Here, in light of the custom being added to UNESCO’s Cultural Heritage list, Leila Gamaz discusses why Algerian women should have the choice whether to enjoy and pass this tradition on to the next generation.

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Midwinter with Margaret Tait: Readings of Personae

On the anniversary of the death of writer and filmmaker Margaret Tait, we celebrate her life’s work with a recording of our event Midwinter with Margaret Tait, a book launch in collaboration with LUX London and So Mayer, which featured special guest speakers Sarah Neely, Lottie Whalen, Pema Monaghan and Alison Miller.

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Interview with Buki Papillon: ‘Know the rules, so that you can break them’

Emma Hanson talks to novelist Buki Papillon about her stunning debut, An Ordinary Wonder, her literary inspirations, studying law and getting over rejection as a writer.

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Poetics of Work by Noémi Lefebvre: an exciting, provocative piece of art

Noémi Lefebvre’s second novel rips apart the structures of late capitalism and nationalism in layered, complex and humorous prose. Elodie Barnes explores the book, and talks to publisher Cécile Lee of Les Fugitives.

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‘Love from Polly’ by Polly Constance

In this poetic record of responses to her close friend and collaborator, Polly Constance captures the broken forms of contact and socially distanced care many of us have encountered during lockdown.

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Interview with prize-winning writer, Nina Mingya Powles: ‘I tend to think of poems as physical objects’

Our writer, Sammy Weaver, talks to poet, essayist and zine-maker, Nina Mingya Powles, about her recent poetry collection, Magnolia, 木蘭, formal techniques and writing, cooking as creativity, Anne Carson as inspiration and her upcoming book, Small Bodies of Water.

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What Happened to the Adders? by Suzannah Ball

In this personal essay, Suzannah Ball meditates on what death means for those left behind, the experience of intergenerational grief and the effect of small but continuous losses on our lives.

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In conversation with award-winning novelist Niven Govinden: ‘I believe in the autonomy of the people that I write’

Kathryn Cutler-MacKenzie talks to award-winning author Niven Govinden about his latest book Diary of a Film, the power and freedom of walking, the importance of the cinematic lens to his writing and assertive characters.

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Disagreements in lockdown by Shamini Sriskandarajah

In this compelling personal essay, Shamini Sriskandarajah recounts a year of trying to connect with friends over text, email, phone and post; of having to explain racism to one white friend and denounce violent sexism to another.

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Preview of Adorable by Ida Marie Hede translated by Sherilyn Nicolette Hellberg

In Ida Marie Hede’s stunningly haunting and humorous novel, Adorable, B and Q’s world changes with the birth of their first child Æ. Here, in a selection of passages from the first section of the novel, the messy birth of Æ and relationship B develops with her are told in gloriously rich detail.

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Surreal Shorts: I’m Afraid That’s All We’ve Got Time For by Jen Calleja

Following Lispector and Carrington in her pursuit of the surreal, Jen Calleja’s fantastical short story collection promises to leave a lasting impression, writes Jade French.

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The Friends You Never Met (2020-2021) by Jess Moody

Sharp, witty and poignant, Jess Moody’s short fiction imagines the encounters and relationships that could have been enjoyed and nurtured were it not for lockdown.

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Fifty Sounds by Polly Barton: a beautiful, complex ode to the Japanese language

In this ‘part-memoir, part-linguistic excavation’, Polly Barton’s experiences of moving to Japan and becoming a literary translator form a love letter to the country and its language.

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