Welcome to Lucy Writers, an online platform devoted to showcasing the writing of women and non-binary creatives.

Lucy Writers is an online platform showcasing the very best writing and art work from women and non-binary creatives all over the world. In collaboration with Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, the platform brings together Lucy students, alumnae and fellows, as well as creatives from outside the college community. Lucy Writers welcomes submissions from women and non-binary writers irrespective of whether they’re an established or new-to-the-writing-desk writer. We want to hear from you; let Lucy Writers be the space, room and home for your words.


Interview with performance artist, Louise Orwin – “I hate this toxic idea that if women become empowered it’s taking something away from men”

Award-winning performance artist Louise Orwin talks to our Arts contributor Carla Plieth about her latest project Oh Yes Oh No and its exploration of female sexual desire, the #MeToo movement, her creative process and more.

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Behind the Myth of the Mad Muse: Dora Maar at Tate Modern

Tate Modern’s latest exhibition celebrates the work of Surrealist artist Dora Maar, drawing her out of the shadow of male contemporaries and challenging the myth of the ‘mad muse’.

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Follow the White Rabbit: the ‘Anthropocene’, Australia and whiteness as pestilence in Amanda Parer’s Intrude at Liverpool Light Show

In light of Amanda Parer’s installation, Intrude, being shown at Liverpool’s Exchange Flags, Sumaya Kassim considers the environmental and cultural devastation of white colonialism in Australia.

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The Quillan Leaf by Gerry Stewart

In her poem, Gerry Stewart shines a light on the overlooked legacy of Sarah Anne Bright, a nineteenth-century artist and photographer who produced one of the earliest surviving photograms initially attributed to William Henry Fox Talbot.

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Still, We’ll Rise Once Again…

Journalist, writer and lecturer Melissa Chemam reflects on the Arnolfini’s recent exhibition Still, I Rise, the cultural history of Bristol and her experience as the gallery’s writer in residence.

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Eurydice Among the Shades

Throughout history Eurydice has been portrayed as a voiceless cypher next to the vocal brilliance of her husband Orpheus. But does the ENO’s 2019 programme of Gluck, Offenbach and Glass alter this? asks our writer Miriam Al Jamil.

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Albrecht Dürer at the Albertina Museum, Vienna

The Albertina’s current exhibition of Renaissance master Albrecht Dürer includes much of his celebrated work, but its the sketches and watercolours found in his personal archives that impress the most, writes Anna Parker.

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Figs in Wigs present The Wind in the Willows, at the Cambridge Junction

The Figs in Wigs are back at the Cambridge Junction, but this time they’re bringing mirth and mischief to young and old alike with their adaptation of The Wind in the Willows.

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Lucian Freud, Portrait of the Artist

Julia Bagguley reflects on the life and work of Lucian Freud in light of the current Royal Academy exhibition of his self portraits.

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The Private Joys of Nnenna Maloney by Okechukwu Nzelu – a beautiful, funny, warm debut

With The Private Joys of Nnenna Maloney, Okechuckwu Nzelu has crafted a brilliant novel about a young woman trying to discover her Nigerian roots and navigate the complexities of love.

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Sandy Wilson’s The Boy Friend, at the Menier Chocolate Factory

Matthew White and Bill Deamer successfully revive Sandy Wilson’s 1950s hit musical, The Boy Friend, about a group of young women at a finishing school in the French Riviera.

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Joseph Toonga’s Born to Manifest at The Place

Drawing from real life accounts of young Black men living in Britain today, Joseph Toonga’s Born to Manifest explores issues of identity and Black masculinity, but for our writer Shirley Ahura this is only the beginning of a very important conversation.

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Botticelli in the Fire at Hampstead Theatre

Jordan Tannahill’s latest play, Botticelli in the Fire, is a glorious queering of Florentine Renaissance, which reveals just as much about the present as it does the past.

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