Welcome to Lucy Writers, an online platform devoted to showcasing the writing of women and non-binary creatives.

Lucy Writers is an online platform showcasing the very best writing and art work from women and non-binary creatives all over the world. In collaboration with Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, the platform brings together Lucy students, alumnae and fellows, as well as creatives from outside the college community. Lucy Writers welcomes submissions from women and non-binary writers irrespective of whether they’re an established or new-to-the-writing-desk writer. We want to hear from you; let Lucy Writers be the space, room and home for your words.


‘Three Wise Women’ by Irenosen Okojie

In her latest work of creative non-fiction, award-winning author Irenosen Okojie explores the rich legacy of hope and life handed down through her mother and grandmother. In hauntingly beautiful prose, Okojie reflects on how past events can offer light and healing in present times of difficulty.

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Postcards in Isolation 14: Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1782

Delving into the rich traditions of gothic literature, sentimental fiction and old folk tales, Henry Fuseli’s The Nightmare, 1782, appears from another world. But not so, says Miriam Al Jamil, who recognises in the painting an awareness of human psychology foreshadowing that found in modern psycho-analysis, dream theory and psychiatry.

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Memories of Low Tide by Chantal Thomas, translated by Natasha Lehrer – ‘like reading across a lifetime of language’

Chantal Thomas’ evocatively layered memoir, Memories of Low Tide, relates the complex, shifting relationship she has with her mother and their mutual love for swimming in the sea.

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Postcards in Isolation 13: Rodin, Bust of Camille Claudel, 1884

Reflecting on the life of Camille Claudel through Rodin’s 1884 bronze bust of the artist, Selin Genc considers her own experience of isolation and celebrates her autonomy even in the midst of lockdown.

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Life in Languages, Chapter 1: Origins

In this first instalment of her self-conceived series, Life in Languages, Elodie Rose Barnes considers how texts in translation have made an impact on her life and writing, especially during lockdown, and sees the art of translation as a bridge in the era of physical distancing.

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Postcards in Isolation 12: Georgia O’ Keeffe, Black Mesa Landscape, New Mexico / Out Back of Marie’s II, 1930

Looking at the New Mexico desert, Georgia O’Keeffe found a new home. In the thirteenth Postcard piece, Emily Garbutt considers O’Keeffe’s vivid, evocative painting, Black Mesa Landscape, New Mexico / Out Back of Marie’s II, 1930, and asks when she will have the opportunity, post-lockdown, to survey a foreign landscape.

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‘Space Paths’ by Pramila Venkateswaran

In our final poem from Usha Akella’s Flora and Fauna series, Pramila Venkateswaran encourages us to look upwards and contemplate the magical, ‘unseen paths’ above the terra firma.

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Postcards in Isolation 11: Zinaida Serebriakova’s At the Dressing Table, 1909 and Dorothea Tanning’s Self Portrait, 1944

Sian Norris reflects on the female gaze as captured in Zinaida Serebriakova’s At the Dressing Table, 1909, and when looking at Dorothea Tanning’s Self-Portrait, 1944, she considers the lack of freedom we have during lockdown.

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Permission by Saskia Vogel – a stunning debut about grief and healing

Saskia Vogel’s beautifully written debut, Permission, is about sex, power, and, yes, BDSM. But it’s also about grief, belonging and the healing that comes from such intimacy, writes our guest editor Elodie Rose Barnes.

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Postcards in Isolation 10: Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940

Isabel Radford reflects on one of Frida Kahlo’s best known works, Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940, and sees the artist as a source of empowerment for our current times.

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‘Cypress’ by Shamini Sriskandarajah

In Shamini Sriskandarajah’s short and beautiful poem, ‘Cypress’, two people sit under the quiet warmth of a leylandii tree reflecting on past moments of togetherness.

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Josephine Baker by Catel and Bocquet – a triumph of research and astounding detail

Dancer, singer, actress, activist and spy: Josephine Baker took both the stage and lectern by storm, as beautifully and boldly conceived in Catel and Bocquet’s graphic novel. But when it comes to her queer relationships they’re decidedly silent, writes our reviewer Gabriela Frost.

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Postcards in Isolation 9: Otto Dix, Portrait of the Journalist Sylvia von Harden, 1926

In Otto Dix’s Portrait of the Journalist Sylvia von Harden, 1926, Lottie Whalen sees both an insouciant New Woman and Dix’s embodiment of a dangerously dissolute era. Recalling a recent encounter with the painting in Paris, she reflects on the freedoms we stand to lose in the time of Covid-19.

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‘Maiden’s Tears’ by Olivia Rosane

In Olivia Rosane’s enchanting and evocative rites-of-passage poem, ‘Maiden’s Tears’, a young woman realises her own inner power and strength when encountering a small wildflower in an open field.

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‘Labelled for Your Convenience’ by Marissa McCallam

In this witty and moving piece, Marissa McCallam reflects on navigating the world as a brown girl, encountering other people’s racist views and prejudices, connecting with her mixed heritage and embracing the freedom and power of ambiguity.

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Postcards in Isolation 8: Guerrilla Girls, The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist, 1988

Kathryn Cutler-MacKenzie reflects on the seminal work, The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist, 1988, by Guerrilla Girls, and calls for women in the art world to be more politically engaged and active in their practise.

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