Welcome to Lucy Writers, an online platform devoted to showcasing the writing of women and non-binary creatives.

Lucy Writers is an online platform showcasing the very best writing and art work from women and non-binary creatives all over the world. In collaboration with Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, the platform brings together Lucy students, alumnae and fellows, as well as creatives from outside the college community. Lucy Writers welcomes submissions from women and non-binary writers irrespective of whether they’re an established or new-to-the-writing-desk writer. We want to hear from you; let Lucy Writers be the space, room and home for your words.


‘Voice’ by So Mayer

After seeing artist Charlotte Salomon’s work in an exhibition before the first lockdown, So Mayer started to reflect on the evolution of Salomon’s innovative, word-strewn paintings. Here, they consider how Salomon’s work conjures and embodies a unique voice, a bold assertion of self that defies curatorial and art historical prejudices.

Read More

Poetics of Work by Noémi Lefebvre: an exciting, provocative piece of art

Noémi Lefebvre’s second novel rips apart the structures of late capitalism and nationalism in layered, complex and humorous prose. Elodie Barnes explores the book, and talks to publisher Cécile Lee of Les Fugitives.

Read More

‘Love from Polly’ by Polly Constance

In this poetic record of responses to her close friend and collaborator, Polly Constance captures the broken forms of contact and socially distanced care many of us have encountered during lockdown.

Read More

Interview with prize-winning writer, Nina Mingya Powles: ‘I tend to think of poems as physical objects’

Our writer, Sammy Weaver, talks to poet, essayist and zine-maker, Nina Mingya Powles, about her recent poetry collection, Magnolia, 木蘭, formal techniques and writing, cooking as creativity, Anne Carson as inspiration and her upcoming book, Small Bodies of Water.

Read More

What Happened to the Adders? by Suzannah Ball

In this personal essay, Suzannah Ball meditates on what death means for those left behind, the experience of intergenerational grief and the effect of small but continuous losses on our lives.

Read More

In conversation with award-winning novelist Niven Govinden: ‘I believe in the autonomy of the people that I write’

Kathryn Cutler-MacKenzie talks to award-winning author Niven Govinden about his latest book Diary of a Film, the power and freedom of walking, the importance of the cinematic lens to his writing and assertive characters.

Read More

Disagreements in lockdown by Shamini Sriskandarajah

In this compelling personal essay, Shamini Sriskandarajah recounts a year of trying to connect with friends over text, email, phone and post; of having to explain racism to one white friend and denounce violent sexism to another.

Read More

Preview of Adorable by Ida Marie Hede translated by Sherilyn Nicolette Hellberg

In Ida Marie Hede’s stunningly haunting and humorous novel, Adorable, B and Q’s world changes with the birth of their first child Æ. Here, in a selection of passages from the first section of the novel, the messy birth of Æ and relationship B develops with her are told in gloriously rich detail.

Read More

Surreal Shorts: I’m Afraid That’s All We’ve Got Time For by Jen Calleja

Following Lispector and Carrington in her pursuit of the surreal, Jen Calleja’s fantastical short story collection promises to leave a lasting impression, writes Jade French.

Read More

The Friends You Never Met (2020-2021) by Jess Moody

Sharp, witty and poignant, Jess Moody’s short fiction imagines the encounters and relationships that could have been enjoyed and nurtured were it not for lockdown.

Read More

Fifty Sounds by Polly Barton: a beautiful, complex ode to the Japanese language

In this ‘part-memoir, part-linguistic excavation’, Polly Barton’s experiences of moving to Japan and becoming a literary translator form a love letter to the country and its language.

Read More

◑ New Suns Journal ◑

Our writer, Sammy Weaver, creates a thrillingly imaginative response to the Barbican’s recent feminist literary festival, New Suns, and reimagines words as seeds, bodies as earth and people as lichens.

Read More

‘We Might Be The Next Toni & Angela’ by Janyce Denise Glasper

In this heartfelt personal essay, artist Janyce Denise Glasper recalls the years of solid friendship she’s shared and enjoyed with writer Asia Aneka Anderson, the Angela Davis to her Toni Morrison.

Read More

It All Comes Down at the Barbican

Bringing together thirteen emerging artists between the ages of 16-25, the Barbican’s latest exhibition, It All Comes Down, explores how young people navigate the world and approach their artistic practise during the pandemic.

Read More

God Unexpected: a short story by Suzannah Ball

God enters into two young girls’ lives without warning, in this vividly haunting story of religion and family dynamics.

Read More

Taking A Long Look: an exhilarating journey through Vivian Gornick’s criticism

Vivian Gornick’s latest collection of essays on literature, culture and feminism demonstrates the power of the voice in personal journalism.

Read More

“We were very merry”: What Ida Nettleship John taught me about friendship and growing up

Reading about the life and friendships of artist Ida Nettleship John has given doctoral student, Eliza Goodpasture, comfort during lockdown and companionship when friends feel far away.

Read More

How I Write: on poetry, grief, and inspiration

Susan Wilson explores the creative space of poetry, writing through grief and loss, poetry as identity, and words as ‘the hope in brilliant darkness of a flame’.

Read More

‘Kindling healing’ and other poems by Kashiana Singh

Kashiana Singh’s tightly knit poems, ‘Kindling healing’ and ‘The night spills’, explore night and day in all their haunting nuance and mesmerising movement.

Read More