Welcome to Lucy Writers, an online platform devoted to showcasing the writing of women and non-binary creatives.

Lucy Writers is an online platform showcasing the very best writing and art work from women and non-binary creatives all over the world. In collaboration with Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, the platform brings together Lucy students, alumnae and fellows, as well as creatives from outside the college community. Lucy Writers welcomes submissions from women and non-binary writers irrespective of whether they’re an established or new-to-the-writing-desk writer. We want to hear from you; let Lucy Writers be the space, room and home for your words.


In conversation with award-winning author, Yvonne Battle-Felton: ‘Writing has made me a better, more empathetic person’

Award-winning author, Yvonne Battle-Felton, talks to Hannah Hutchings-Georgiou about her exceptional debut, Remembered, her journey into academia and writing, her courageous women characters, and the inspiring maternal figures in her life.

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Sisters by Daisy Johnson – a gothic masterpiece for our times

Daisy Johnson’s second novel, Sisters, is a haunting tale of sibling love and resentment, a gothic masterpiece brilliantly brought to life.

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Racialised Representations of the Girl Squad

Shows like Dear White People, I May Destroy You and Insecure are to be applauded for focusing on friendships between black women. But, argues, Aysha Abdulrazak, to what extent are these being informed by a white supremacist lens? And who are they for?

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Sissal Kampmann’s Darkening / Myrking: Poems in Faroese & interview with translator Marita Thomsen

Elodie Rose Barnes reviews Sissal Kampmann’s Faroese poetry collection, Darkening/Myrking, and speaks to translator Marita Thomsen about translating Kampmann’s work, Faroese weather, gender in language, and reading translated texts.

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What my silence in the deaf community taught me about directness and honesty

When Majella Mark was left unable to speak because of health problems, she felt alone and excluded. But on discovering New York’s hearing impaired community, she made new friends and learned to communicate in a way she never had before.

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Booker Prize Shortlist 2020: a daring, diverse and deserving line-up of authors

Our contributors review this year’s Booker Prize shortlist and find a daring and diverse list of authors from around the world who all deserve to be celebrated.

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‘My friend, there are no friends’: on mourning, abandonment and reckonings

In the first essay of her co-edited and co-conceived series, Disembodied Voices: Friendship during COVID-19, Sumaya Kassim reflects on the breakdown of a friendship, exploring feelings of abandonment, rejection and grief that led her to self-evaluate and cultivate new intimacy and care.

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Ophelia Redux

Millais’ painting, Ophelia, continues to inspire viewers and critics alike, but what if the heroine came back from the watery grave she was condemned to? Here, Hannah Hutchings-Georgiou considers the return of Ophelia in the artwork of Jada Bruney and Rolake Osabia, and the music visuals of Christine and the Queens.

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Interview with translator Jennifer Russell: ‘Different languages open up different things in the mind’

Elodie Rose Barnes talks to translator Jennifer Russell about translating Amalie Smith’s masterful new novel, Marble, the hybridity and liminality of translation, the brilliance of Danish sculptor Anne Marie Carl-Nielsen, new projects with writer Ursula Scavenius and more.

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Preview of Amalie Smith’s Marble, translated by Jennifer Russell

Amalie Smith’s exciting new novel, Marble, sensuously intertwines the story and discoveries of its titular heroine with those of pioneering sculptor Anne Marie Carl-Nielsen, who lived and worked 110 years earlier. In this preview, Marble reflects on Carl-Nielsen’s time in Athens and the new material reality open to her when separated from her lover.

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Artemisia at the National Gallery, London

The National Gallery’s blockbuster exhibition celebrates the professional ingenuity, self-confidence and skilful proto-feminist paintings of one of Italy’s best Early Modern women artists, Artemisia Gentileschi.

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Nina Mingya Powles’ Magnolia, 木蘭

Nina Mingya Powles’ exciting new collection, Magnolia, 木蘭, is a celebratory exploration of languages, and the cultures, experiences, and worlds that lie within them.

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‘Mother Tongue’ by Yen Ooi

Yen Ooi’s poem, ‘Mother Tongue’, is a bold and resolute response to those who project ideas onto a person’s skin and fail to see the individual for who they are, in all their cultural, linguistic and ethnic multiplicity.

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The Doll of Divine Discovery: Nocturnal Revelations of the Wild Woman in ‘Women Who Run with the Wolves’

Clarissa Pinkola Estés’ classic work, Women Who Run with the Wolves, encourages readers to embrace their inner ‘wild woman’ using myths from around the world. Here, our writer Emma Hanson explores the importance of night in one of the book’s tales, ‘Vasalisa’.

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‘Daykêmîn (Mother)’ by Rojbin Arjen Yigit

In Rojbin Arjen Yigit’s powerful poem, ‘Daykêmîn (Mother)’, a child sits to dinner savouring her mother’s stories of when she first arrived in Britain and had to navigate many cultural and linguistic barriers.

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‘The Unreliable Translator’, an extract from Jen Calleja’s novel, The Islets

Jen Calleja’s novel, The Islets, is a timely and daring exploration of xenophobia, cultural exploitation, historical suppression and amnesia, and the politics of literary translation. In this preview, ‘The Unreliable Translator’, the main character, Hester Heller, interviews a renowned translator, uncovering more about his work than she intended.

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