Welcome to Lucy Writers, an online platform devoted to showcasing the writing of women and non-binary creatives.

Lucy Writers is an online platform showcasing the very best writing and art work from women and non-binary creatives all over the world. In collaboration with Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, the platform brings together Lucy students, alumnae and fellows, as well as creatives from outside the college community. Lucy Writers welcomes submissions from women and non-binary writers irrespective of whether they’re an established or new-to-the-writing-desk writer. We want to hear from you; let Lucy Writers be the space, room and home for your words.


In conversation with award-winning writer, Sinéad Gleeson: ‘We need to pay homage to those women who didn’t have as much autonomy and freedom as we have now’

Laura Hackett talks to acclaimed writer Sinéad Gleeson about uplifting the literary voices and stories of Irish women, art as a means to communicate pain and the role of storytelling during 2018’s historic referendum. 

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Into the Night: Cabarets and Clubs in Modern Art, at the Barbican Art Gallery

Illustrious clubs and night spots in Mexico, Iran, Nigeria and numerous European cities are celebrated – and recreated – in the Barbican’s latest exhibition, Into the Night: Cabarets and Clubs in Modern Art.

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My Country: A Syrian Memoir by Kassem Eid – an accomplished, deeply moving book

Kassem Eid’s memoir moves through life in pre-war Syria to his time as a FSA resistance fighter and beyond. Beautifully written, captivating and horrific in equal parts, My Country: A Syrian Memoir is a must read, writes Clarissa Hjalmarsson.

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Women in the Arts: A Panel Discussion at Dulwich Picture Gallery

Sarah Crompton chairs a panel of curators, artists and the director of the Dulwich Picture Gallery to discuss the future of women in the art world, as reported by Arts writer Miriam Al Jamil.

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Women’s Weird – Stunning short stories that fright (& fight) with their social commentary

Melissa Edmundson’s short story collection, Women’s Weird, is full of literary greats such as Edith Wharton, May Sinclair and Edith Nesbit. Their stories are packed with ghosts, ghouls and weird occurrences, but, says Gabriela Frost, the most chilling aspect is the social treatment of women.

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(Re)locating the self: space and place in Ann Quin’s ‘Eyes that Watch Behind the Wind’

In her essay, Alice Hill-Woods discusses the positioning of self in the spaces and places of Ann Quin’s short story, ‘Eyes that Watch Behind the Wind’, which is part of her recently published collection, The Unmapped Country: Stories and Fragments.

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Isadora by Julie Birmant and Clément Ouberie – an engrossing, beautifully illustrated graphic novel

The American-French dancer, Isadora Duncan, has been described as an ‘oversaturated subject’, but a new graphic novel shows her life and contribution to dance in a new light, writes Francesca Dytor.

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Ron Athey’s Acephalous Monster at the Cambridge Junction

Ron Athey’s Acephalous Monster comes with warnings of nudity, bloodletting, BDSM and graphic sexual content, but at its heart is a message of resistance and political activism.

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Shobana Jeyasingh Dance’s Staging Schiele at the Queen Elizabeth Hall

In Staging Schiele, Shobana Jeyasingh Dance brilliantly captures the work and life of Austrian artist Egon Schiele, and reframes the stories of his female models.

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Serendipity’s BHM Live at the Curve Leicester: powerful stories not just for Black History Month, but every month thereafter

Serendipity’s BHM Live showcases work by some of the best choreographers from the dance world to date. But these breathtaking performances should be seen every day, all year round, not just during Black History Month, writes Hannah Hutchings-Georgiou.

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Jane Austen’s The Watsons at the Menier Chocolate Factory

Laura Wade’s witty theatrical rewrite of Jane Austen’s unfinished novel, The Watsons, comments on female authorship, agency and joyfully sends up actors, writers and pseudo-intellectualism.

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ZooNation’s Some Like It Hip Hop at the Peacock Theatre

Eight years after its debut, Some Like It Hip Hop returns to the stage, finally securing hip hop a deserving home in West End theatre.

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Starting at the tail end of the snake: Islamic art, British Orientalism and contemporary responses at the British Museum and Watts Gallery

Two exhibitions at the British Museum and Watts Gallery strive to re-contextualise European Orientalism and emphasise artistic relationships between east and west, but do they succeed? asks our arts writer Miriam Al Jamil.

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