Welcome to Lucy Writers, an online platform devoted to showcasing the writing of women and non-binary creatives.

Lucy Writers is an online platform showcasing the very best writing and art work from women and non-binary creatives all over the world. In collaboration with Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, the platform brings together Lucy students, alumnae and fellows, as well as creatives from outside the college community. Lucy Writers welcomes submissions from women and non-binary writers irrespective of whether they’re an established or new-to-the-writing-desk writer. We want to hear from you; let Lucy Writers be the space, room and home for your words.


Interview with Sara Collins, acclaimed author of The Confessions of Frannie Langton – ‘Novels start with questions, identifying the space the book is going to fill, and Frannie was my way of trying to fill that gap’

The Prize-winning and Oprah Magazine ‘Inspired Women’ author Sara Collins talks to our arts contributor, My Ly, about her stunning debut novel, the uniting power of anger for women, the importance of setting and her routine as a writer.

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Dream Ritual by Bongsu Park at The Print Room

South Korean artists Bongsu Park and Jinyeob Cha join forces to produce Dream Ritual, a delicate, mesmerising and fascinating multi-sensory journey through sleep and dreams, writes our arts contributor My Ly.

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Stoke Newington Literary Festival 2019 – a brilliant literary festival that’ll make you fall in love with Hackney again

Talks featuring Kerry Hudson, Anita Sethi, Natasha Carthew, Julia Bueno, Sali Hughes, Lynn Enright and many more were some of the highlights at this year’s Stoke Newington Literary Festival. Victoria Smith writes about the panels and which books are a must for your 2019 summer reading list.

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Phoenix Dance Theatre’s The Rite of Spring & Left Unseen at the Peacock Theatre

Haitian vodou rituals and an exploration of sensory experiences and emplacement come together in Phoenix Dance Theatre’s innovative double bill at the Peacock Theatre.

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Lee Krasner: Living Colour at the Barbican Art Gallery

The Barbican’s Lee Krasner: Living Colour is a long overdue celebration of an indomitable artist whose ingenious eye offers a kaleidoscopic perspective on the inner and outer worlds that shape our lives, writes our arts contributor Dr Lottie Whalen.

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Ballet Flamenco Sara Baras’ ‘Sombras’ at Sadler’s Wells’ Flamenco Festival London 2019

Ballet Flamenco Sara Baras opens this year’s Flamenco Festival London at Sadler’s Wells to well-deserved uproarious applause with their enthrallingly innovative and spectacular show, Sombras.

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Why Always Be My Maybe is “the One”!

Netflix’s latest rom-com offering, Always Be My Maybe, sidesteps the monotony of the genre and presents a product fit for a 2019 audience.

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Natalia Goncharova at Tate Modern

Tate Modern’s latest retrospective of the Russian avant-garde artist, Natalia Goncharova, is a triumph of colour, style and artistic brilliance, writes our arts contributor Gabriela Frost.

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Camp: Notes on Fashion at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Following its grand opening at the Met Gala, the exhibition Camp: Notes on Fashion explores the concept of ‘camp’ through a Sontagion lens and reveals its cultural, political and social significance today, writes our contributor Georgia Good.

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Strange Fruit by Caryl Phillips at the Bush Theatre

Caryl Phillip’s Strange Fruit is a story of anxiety interwoven with anger – a domestic tightrope where language fails to bridge the gap between generations, writes our arts contributor Yosola Olorunshola.

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Kerry Hudson’s Lowborn – a remarkable portrait of ‘dehumanising poverty’, but also love, compassion and self-determination

Kerry Hudson’s precise, intricate and intelligently written memoir, Lowborn, revisits the brutal realities of poverty and the deprived places of Hudson’s own childhood.

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Rachael Allen’s Kingdomland – poems that are dark and frightening yet strangely beautiful

Violence, fear and the menace of the mundane all feature in Rachael Allen’s debut collection, Kingdomland, but a strange beauty permeates throughout, writes our contributor Maz Hedgehog.

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‘Snip Snip’ by Victoria Smith, Joint Second Place in the Lucy Writers Flash Fiction Competition

Keeley is one of the few hairdressers left in the kingdom when the resident dictator requires a new hair cut. Terrified of saying no, three guards whisk her off to the palace to trim his ‘Eminence’s’ hair. Victoria Smith’s witty and deftly told short story is one for Angela Carter fans everywhere.

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